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Blood Pressure Goals for Elderly Hypertensive 

Generally speaking, for the people over 60 years old, normal systolic blood pressure can be extended to 150 mmHg. Diastolic blood pressure is still 90 mmHg. Blood pressure goals is 150/90 mmHg. If the Elderly hypertensive patients with diabetes or chronic kidney disease, Blood pressure goals is 140/90 mmHg. You should try your best to keep your blood pressure below your blood pressure goal.

Blood pressure goals for elderly without diabetes or chronic kidney disease:
130/70 mmHg < blood pressure < 150/90 mmHg, Pulse pressur (SBP-DBP) < 70 mmHg

Blood pressure goals for elderly with diabetes or chronic kidney disease:
130/70 mmHg < blood pressure < 140/90 mmHg, Pulse pressur (SBP-DBP) < 70 mmHg

What’s the optimal level to which the blood pressure of elderly patients with hypertension should be decreased? Or how to define the target level of their blood pressure? This issue has caught the common attention of many people. Patients should have their blood pressure decreased in a temperate manner, and seeking ideal blood pressure (is less than 120/80 mmHg) blindly will backfire and not be conducive to their health.

The target value of blood pressure of patients with hypertension aged over 60 is generally 130-150/70-90 mmHg, rather than 120/80 mmHg, the ideal level of normal people. This is because elderly people manifest vascular aging of different degrees, which leads to decreased elasticity of the vascular walls of their arteries, therefore, the blood pressure of elderly patients cannot be controlled to the normal blood pressure level. Besides, the diastolic pressure of elderly patients is usually relatively low due to atherosclerosis, and too low blood pressure results in exceedingly low diastolic pressure and increased pulse pressure, which will increase the risk of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events. When the diastolic pressure of patients is lower than 70 mmHg, the lower their blood pressure is, the higher their case-fatality rate will be. This is why the target systolic pressure of elderly patients with hypertension can be increased to 150 mmHg.

The blood pressure of elderly people is bound to increase as they age, and such an elevation in blood pressure is, in fact, a physiological compensation. And the bodies of patients have produced adaptive changes since they have elevated blood pressure for a long time. If their blood pressure is decreased to too low levels or too quickly, inadequate blood flow hypoperfusion in their local tissues will occur, and even induced angina, myocardial infarction, cerebral infarction or aggravated dementia may appear. 

For elderly patients with hypertension aged over 70, their systolic blood pressure does not increase as they age, whereas their diastolic blood pressure decreases year by year. The use of antihypertensive drugs at this time must be accompanied by close observation to prevent exceedingly low diastolic blood pressure. For elderly hypertensive patients aged over 80, their blood pressure is decreased naturally, and most patients present with concomitant severe decreased function of heart, brain and kidneys. Antihypertensive drugs should not be used casually in such patients, and in particular, intravenous injection or infusion of antihypertensive drugs, such as nitroglycerin injection and sodium nitroprusside, should be avoided. In addition, for elderly hypertensive patients with heart, brain, kidney diseases or severe lower limb lesions, or with diastolic blood pressure lower than 70 mmHg, where appropriate, their target systolic blood pressure can be increased to 140-160 mmHg according to their conditions.

In conclusion, hypertension is an important risk factor for deaths of elderly people, and it must be taken seriously. Antihypertensive drugs should be taken in time for those to whom such drugs are necessary, whereas blood pressure being decreased to too low levels or too fast should be prevented at the same time. The definition of the blood pressure goals must be based on the principle of individualization.

Next Page:
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See also:
The greater the pulse pressure is, the more risks there will be
Narrow the pulse pressure without non antihypertensive drug
Systolic hypertension in elderly (SBP > 160 mmHg, DBP < 90 mmHg)
Decreased systolic pressure can better indicate the actual effects of blood pressure control
Drugs for complications of hypertension in the elderly
Will Exceedingly Decreased Blood Pressure Lead to Stroke?

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