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Management of hypertension in the elderly

The greater the pulse pressure is, the more risks there will be

The so-called pulse pressure refers to the value of systolic pressure minus diastolic pressure. For example, your systolic pressure is 140 mmHg and diastolic pressure is 90 mmHg, the pulse pressure is 50 mmHg. The value of normal pulse pressure is about 40 mmHg, which is generally greater than 60 mmHg, which is called Increased Pulse Pressure. With the increase in age and extension of disease duration, patients’ pulse pressure will be gradually increased. People were always thinking that this was a normal phenomenon. Many elderly hypertensive patients often think that although their systolic pressure is high, their diastolic pressure is normal, and thus they feel gratified. In fact, such an understanding is wrong. Pulse deficit is an important indicator reflecting the degree of arterial injury, and the real causes of increased pulse deficit are atherosclerosis and fibrosis. Increased pulse deficit indicates poor elasticity of blood vessels.

Hypertension (high blood pressure), diabetes and aging, etc. can change the structures and functions of arterial walls so that the vascular walls harden and elasticity worsens, resulting in arterial dilation and increased pulse deficit. The pulse deficit usually starts to increase after patients with hypertension are 50 years of age. Increased pulse deficit is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases just like elevations in systolic and diastolic pressures. Under normal circumstances, the higher the value of a patient’s systolic or diastolic blood pressure is, the greater the risk of his disease will be. When the systolic blood pressure of a hypertensive patient is higher than 130 mmHg , the higher his systolic blood pressure is and the lower his diastolic blood pressure is, the more dangerous his disease will be. For example, the risk of cardiovascular diseases in hypertensive patients with the systolic blood pressure at 160 mmHg and the diastolic blood pressure at 75 mmHg is 12% higher than that in hypertensive patients with the systolic pressure at 160 mmHg and the diastolic blood pressure at 95 to 12%, which is attributable to pulse pressure

See also:
Blood pressure goals for elderly
The greater the pulse pressure is, the more risks there will be
Narrow the pulse pressure without non antihypertensive drug
Systolic hypertension in elderly (SBP > 160 mmHg, DBP < 90 mmHg)
Decreased systolic pressure can better indicate the actual effects of blood pressure control
Drugs for complications of hypertension in the elderly
Will Exceedingly Decreased Blood Pressure Lead to Stroke?

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